Security

Where do we get our sense of security? Is it from the fences that we construct around us, or the doors that obscure the thieves from view? How can we best protect our objects of value?  Perhaps the solution lies not in having objects of  value, but rather to make the door the object of value.  But, at what scale does this value become explicit? Is a door large enough to not be stolen?  I suppose it depends on the door.  Another ingredient is needed.  Exposure is the other key to security.  As much as it pains us to give up a little of our precious privacy, it is important to note that no object of significant size in a public place is ever in danger of being stolen.  One need not look any further than Rockefeller Center in New York City. Featured prominently is the statue of Prometheus, a work of immense value, not only for its materials, but for what it has come to represent. It’s scale, and constant public surveillance make it impossible to steal.  As Utopian as this concept might seem, it is important to remember that the importance of privacy exists in this country as a result of the fears of our “forefathers,” men who in reaction to the crown sought to create a nation free of the constraints of an oppressive government.  In doing so, they have created a nation fearful of its own government, and willing to arm itself with a neolithic sense of entitlement in the age of information.  In this modern age, let us reconsider the Gothic church, built not to house God, but rather to be God for the illiterate, and so imbued with value as an object of scale that it denies an atomistic approach.  In its abundance is undeniably public and secure.  Might we extend this courtesy to the ourselves as well?

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